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Janggi - 장기 - Korean Chess. The variant of chess played in Korea. (9x10, Cells: 90) (Recognized!)[All Comments] [Add Comment or Rating]
darren paull wrote on 2009-09-08 UTC
Hi 
I enjoy playing Changgi on this site,though I'm wondering :is there any provision to swap the the Elephants and Knights ,at the beginning if the game?

Yu Ren Dong wrote on 2009-07-19 UTC
In N Korea, the initial positions of Rooks and Elepahnts are changed each other. It is a different opening setup. 

http://ko.wikipedia.org/wiki/%ED%8C%8C%EC%9D%BC:Yang_sang2.png

Anonymous wrote on 2008-11-21 UTC
It seems that the URL I have posted is deleted not because PDF files inside
the zip files were corrupt, but rather because the files' names were in
Korean texts, and English Window doesn't support Korean texts unless
Korean texts were installed.

Thus, I am reposting URL with new zip file that contains renamed English
PDF files.

http://yeo123.com.ne.kr/janggipieces.zip

The above zip file contains printable janggi pieces made in PDF
documents.

First, simply paint the letters of the pieces.

Then you can fold along the dotted lines and use glue to form octogonal
prism shape.

Have fun!

Jean-Louis Cazaux wrote on 2008-11-21 UTC
How to procure the nice pieces shown on Jose Carillo's photograph on this comment page?
Thanks.

Anonymous wrote on 2008-11-21 UTC
[url deleted because archive is corrupt]

The above zip file contains printable janggi pieces made in PDF
documents.

First, simply paint the letters of the pieces.

Then you can fold along the dotted lines and use glue to form octogonal
prism shape.

Have fun!

Anonymous wrote on 2008-09-28 UTC
Hi, 
I find out that download link in this message is broken. 
-------------------------------------------------------
I 'd like to introduce a new Korean chess playing freeware for MS
Windows XP. 

http://blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=a840713&logNo=30027088697# 
(in Korean) 

http://mfiles.naver.net/6bbc5e8692cba7113b5b/data28/2008/1/28/136/jang-a840713.exe

(right-click & 'save as'  to download ) 

(He used visual studio 2005) 

File- S : begin 
File-x : eXit 
Drag & Drop to move pieces 
Right-click : undo 

He is a computer science major in South Korea. 
He titled this freeware 'Choding janggi' 

choding is a Korean slang for elememtary school kids. 
and you can guess that his software plays at an elementary level. :) 

I found out that it runs well under Linux. 
I tested with Ubuntu linux (a freeware) and codeweaves crossover 
games 
(a commercial software www.codeweavers.com/products) 
which is based on wine (http://www.winehq.org). 

-----------------------------------------------------

So, visit here 
http://blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=a840713&logNo=30027088697# 

And download it this way. 
http://imugi2.com.ne.kr/choding1.htm

Anonymous wrote on 2008-09-11 UTC
free printable janggi boards/pieces in PDF format

free printable janggi boards/pieces in PDF format

------------------------------------------

Both files are different from one another.

Jose Carrillo wrote on 2008-09-03 UTC
My 'Western' rendition of a Changgi board.



Inspired by:
A Western Xiangqi Board

Anonymous wrote on 2008-09-02 UTC
free printable janggi board and pieces

http://imugi2.com.ne.kr/janggipieces.htm

George Duke wrote on 2008-06-27 UTCGood ★★★★
Thanks for attention, Charles. Daniel expresses interesting opinions here. Daniel has missed prior topics showing USA, Canadian, UK, and French chess patents back to 1870's. Scrabble and Monopoly are originally patented. Verbosity like ''insult to rich history of Chess'' is so much uninformed babble. Precedents for Falcon include, besides this Changgi, Gala (13th Century), Novo Chess (1930's), problem piece Bison (1970's). There are two Camel-Bison-Knight compounds in 'ECV', one of course Maus' Cavalry Chess(1920's). There are about 6 and about 15 respectively of Knight-Zebra and Knight-Camel. All these I (hey the team WE) made USA Patent & Trademark Office aware of: fortunately Pritchard's book had just come out. The clauses ''anyone can...'' or ''one can easily add...'' or words to that effect are commonly applied to Patents jealously later. Why be devoting minds to this if it has no merit? A great idea is obvious after the fact, as Jeremy Good defends the Falcon innovation. Please ask Fourriere or Carlos about game play with three-path Falcon.

Charles Daniel wrote on 2008-06-27 UTCGood ★★★★
This game (and several others) have the lame knight and lame zebra (here elephant). That is both pieces are incapable of moving to destination if path is blocked. For the elephant, one can easily add more possible pathways to destination square for example two diagonal and one orthogonal outwards.

Combining the knight and elephant here - and adding alternate paths, one gets the Sliding Sorcerer Knight used in experimental sub-variation of Herculean Chess

As used in Korean Chess, the Elephant /Knight as used here make for excellent play.

However, as previously noted, the two compounded do not make for good game-play as some might expected. I tried it out and was not impressed.
Even worse would be to compound a zebra and camel and adding multiple paths - nothing new of course - (anyone can do this!).

Patenting an already existing idea is truly an insult to the rich history of chess, but it has been done by a few. Fortunately, the few patents for pieces ( not sure how many are out there but one comes to mind) , are for awkward pieces proposed with even more clumsy configurations.

The patent and its well deserved criticism of course do not apply to excellent single function pieces such as the Elephant and Knight used here nor to the interesting Ferz-Camel compound used in Omega Chess nor for that matter the fascinating Ferz/Wazir Sorcerers in Hadean and Herculean Chess.

Anonymous wrote on 2008-05-06 UTC
I 'd like to introduce a new Korean chess playing freeware for MS Windows
XP. 


http://blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=a840713&logNo=30027088697# 
(in Korean) 

http://mfiles.naver.net/6bbc5e8692cba7113b5b/data28/2008/1/28/136/jang-a840713.exe

(right-click & 'save as'  to download ) 


(He used visual studio 2005) 


File- S : begin 
File-x : eXit 
Drag & Drop to move pieces 
Right-click : undo 


He is a computer science major in South Korea. 
He titled this freeware 'Choding janggi' 


choding is a Korean slang for elememtary school kids. 
and you can guess that his software plays at an elementary level. :) 


I found out that it runs well under Linux. 
I tested with Ubuntu linux (a freeware) and codeweaves crossover 
games 
(a commercial software www.codeweavers.com/products) 
which is based on wine (http://www.winehq.org).

Anonymous wrote on 2008-03-26 UTC
http://member.hangame.com/register/index.nhn?docref=http://id.hangame.com/wlogin.nhn?popup=false&adult=false&nxtURL=http%3A//janggi.hangame.com/ choose check two boxes with left buttons and choose the right most button (the third one from left) which doesn't require you to enter Korean registration ID number. http://www.hangame.co.jp in Japanese. http://www.nhnusainc.com in English? Maybe.

Anonymous wrote on 2008-03-09 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Hello, nice site.
I was just wondering of you knew of any places to play online, since I
can't seem to access Korean game sites (they require some kind of Korean
registration ID number that foreigners don't have). 
Let me know if you are aware of a place to play online. Thanks.

Anonymous wrote on 2007-06-12 UTC
mms://210.221.200.86:4768

24 hours a day broadcasting for (Korean) chess
with some commercial breaks.

mostly in Korean.

M Winther wrote on 2007-03-01 UTC
This is a good initiative as it is hard to obtain information about this game. Korean Chess is a game with greater strategical depth than Chinese Chess. The Korean Elephant is of particular interest. I implemented a strong Zillions version here. /Mats

TrogglePogPigtree wrote on 2007-03-01 UTC

I made a boring but informational film about Korean Chess. Americans who know how to play Chess might find it helpful, I plan on posting an example game soon. I hope someone finds this helpful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzlaaL5sRno


M Winther wrote on 2006-11-11 UTC
According to Wurman ('Chinesisches Schach, Koreanisches Schach', 1991), Maynard ('Janggi Addenda', Abstract Games 15, Autumn 2003), and Pritchard (Encyclopedia of Chess Variants, 1994), a player can pass at any time, which means that rule 7c above is wrong.

Alfred Pfeiffer wrote on 2006-11-06 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
Precision to an entry in the section 'Books':

  Wurman, David: 'Chinesisches Schach, Koreanisches Schach'.
  Verlag Harry Deutsch, Franfurt am Main, Thun; 1991, 
  ISBN 3-8171-1166-5

Anonymous wrote on 2006-09-06 UTC
netian went out of business while I did not pay attention to it.
The game fils are not downloadable any longer.

Anonymous wrote on 2006-06-23 UTC
Hi,

I uploaded pro players' official games here.

http://my.netian.com/~smyune/kbsjanggikwang.zip

size : 33.4KB 

Han : upper side
Cho : lower side and make the first move

Christine Bagley-Jones wrote on 2006-06-18 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
oh this should be rated better than good!

Anonymous wrote on 2006-03-25 UTC
http://my.netian.com/~smyune/bikjang.html

Red Army moved its Horse (Knight) from 65 to 77.

Now, there are no pieces between two Kings.
(Naked Kings).

Blue Army can declare 'bik' (=draw)
by capturing Red Army King with its King.

This rule applys even if the case is a checkmate.

chris wrote on 2006-03-23 UTCExcellent ★★★★★
If you use your horse to checkmate your opponent and your general faces the opponent's general, could it be a draw?

Anonymous wrote on 2006-02-11 UTC
2005-07-11 Jeff  None Hello,

I am a Canadian who plays Changi 1-2 a week. I have been doing so for
about a year and a half and simply love the game!

I was wondering if there are any organized tournaments of Changi in Korea
or in the States or Canada.

Please email me at: shazaar@hotmail.com if you have any info!

Cheers

------my reply from South Korea--------------------------------
 
http://www.kbs.co.kr/1tv/sisa/jangy/index.html

http://www.braintv.co.kr/main.asp
http://janggi.hangame.com/

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